#3      01/02/2018

Davey Rimmer

Q: HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN PLAYING?
DR: I got my first bass at age 11 and carried on from there.

Q: WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST BASS GUITAR?
DR: My first bass guitar was a very cheap Kay Bass which was right handed but flipped over to play lefty.

Q: DO YOU PLAY ANY OTHER INSTRUMENTS?
DR: I am a frustrated drummer so I love to bash the kit occasionally. I also play a bit of guitar at home for writing and demo purposes.

Q: WHICH BASSES HAVE YOU TOURED WITH BESIDES THE ONES YOU CURRENTLY ENDORSE?
DR: I am endorsed by Warwick Basses but I have played live with Fender and Spector Basses over the years.

Q: ARE YOU A COLLECTOR? IF SO HOW MANY BASSES DO YOU OWN?

DR: Being left handed has always been a problem to grow my collection but yes, I have a collection of about 20 basses of various shapes and sizes… and all left handed!

Q: WHICH ONE IS YOUR FAVORITE?
DR: My favorite would be my Warwick John Entwhistle Buzzard bass.

Q: DO YOU HAVE A DREAM BASS YOU DON’T OWN RIGHT NOW?
DR: It would probably be an Alembic Dragon Wing bass… but at about $10,000 I will have to think about it carefully!

Q: WHO ARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSICIANS?
DR: I have so many favorite musicians… Bass players are John Deacon, John Entwhistle, Billy Sheehan and Chuck Wright. Guitarists are Paul Gilbert, Brian May, Richie Blackmore and of course Mick Box! But if I had to pick only one, probably Freddie Mercury.

Q: WHAT WAS THE FIRST CONCERT YOU EVER ATTENDED?
DR: My first concert was Queen with Freddie back in the 80’s.

Q: WHAT WAS THE FIRST ALBUM/SINGLE YOU BOUGHT AS A KID?
DR: The first album I ever bought was “Queen Live Killers”. The first single I ever bought was Queen’s Don’t Stop Me Now. I was 9 years old and it blew my mind!

Q: IF YOU HAD TO PICK YOUR TOP 5 MUSIC ALBUMS, WHAT WOULD THEY BE?
DR:
1. Queen – Sheer Heart Attack
2. The Beatles – Abbey Road
3. Thin Lizzy – Live and Dangerous
4. Queen – A Night at the Opera
5. Uriah Heep – Look at Yourself


#2      12/19/2017

Phil Lanzon

Q :
HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN PLAYING?
PL: Started Piano at eight years. went onto Hammond organ some years later - M162 which was stollen from the back of our van. Had a hand built Leslie which was amazing but got smashed up somewhere.

Q: WHICH KEYBOARDS HAVE YOU TOURED WITH BESIDES THE ONES YOU CURRENTLY ENDORSE?
PL: Roland and Korg for 99% of the tours

Q: HOW MANY RIGS DO YOU OWN NOW?
PL:I'm using the Leslie 3300B which is a monster, plenty of overdrive and tone. I also have a trusty monitor engineer. Thank God!!!


Q: WHICH ONE IS YOUR FAVORITE?
PL:The above


Q: DO YOU HAVE A DREAM RIG?
PL:I suppose I could always stack a half dozen 3300B's. let me think about that!!!

Q: WHO ARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSICIANS?
PL:For innovation, Tony Banks of Genesis. For manual dexterity, Keith Emerson. For one of the originators, Jimmy Smith. Then there’s Todd Rundgren, Neil Hannon, Dave Gilmour. No need for any more as I'll run out of computer storage.


Q: ANY ADVICE FOR BEGINNERS?
PL:Be passionate about the music you want to play. If it's really what you want then let nothing get in the way.


Q: ANY ADVICE FOR ADVANCED PLAYERS IN GROWING THEIR SKILL LEVEL.
PL:Yes, Get as much experience in the live situation as you can and keep trying new ideas. there are many different techniques out there but you already know that. Also, incorporate your style into your writing to take it further. Experiment with different genres.



#1       12/11/2017

Mick Box

Q:
For so many guitar greats it was the Beatles on the Ed Sullivan show that was their first inspiration to learn guitar, form a band, or write songs. What was the initial motivation that got you to pick up a guitar and learn to play?

MB: My introduction was via Jazz Guitar with such greats as Django Reinhardt, Barney Kessal, Tal Farlow & Mickey Baker. My guitar teacher was from Walthamstow in the East End of London and he was a guy called Alan Hodginson who played with with Django in France. He was apparently the back-up guitarist for him in the famous Paris Hot Club 5. Hence the jazz connection, as that is the style that he taught.

In the Rock field, it was seeing Micky Green the guitarist with Johnny Kid and the Pirates. He played a Telecaster and they had a song called ’Shakin’ All Over’ with a wonderful shimmering riff in it. The other concert that made me want to be a musician for life was a band called ’Them’ with Van Morrison singing for them. They had a great song called ‘Baby Please Don’t Go,’ with another great riff. I also saw the ‘Kinks’ on a package tour at my local cinema playing ‘You Really Got Me’ and that was it. Another great riff though this time a chord based riff.

Q: Do you play any other instruments?

MB: Not that I can say I can play them.

Q: Of all your influences, who are they and which of them do you think comes through in your playing the most?

MB: My favourite guitar player of all time is Jeff Beck, but I have never ever sat down to work out any of his guitar licks. I don’t really copy anyone or anything, but I doodle to a point where something interests me and I develop that. That way you develop your own playing style. Along the way of course there has been Buddy Holly, Eddie Cochrane, Hank Marvin and the Shadows, The Beatles, Joe Walsh, Neil Young etc

Q: Guitar players who own several guitars will usually say they have a couple of favourites. What are some of yours?

MB: Electric: Black Beauty Les Paul, Fender Stratocaster, and my own signature Carparelli S4. Acoustic: Martin D28 6 & 12 string.

Q: Do you write with the guitar, or is there another instrument like piano that you compose with? If it is guitar do you have a preference, acoustic or electric, when you are coming up with new material?

MB: Only on guitar either Electric or Acoustic. Usually it is a riff or chord sequence that excites me, then I will work on it and develop it into a song format.

Q: Do you still have a practice regime?

MB: I just doodle. I am not one for playing scales and all of that as I am self taught, so I doodle away to me hearts content. Usually I am writing in this process which kind of comes under the heading of practice too.

Q: You play a number of different guitars. When playing them live, do you do anything to your signal chain to compensate their different output levels?

MB: I usually run with the same sound from start to finish live and I only ever use the volume pot for loud or louder. At most I will add a chorus pedal but I would rather be playing than tap dancing. I do use the Cry Baby as more of an expression pedal than the Wah function. I sometimes try and find a frequency that when I solo it sits on top of the band.

Q: Do you use in-ears or wedges for monitors live, and why?

MB: Monitors. I do not like having things in my ears anyway and I am prone to getting infections that way too, so it is a no no. The other thing is that if live I get a lovely feedback note out of my cabinet I can move into it and use it that night to great effect, but I am not sure with in-ears you can do that. Also you are reliant on your monitor engineer, and I like to control that myself. Sometimes you see band members waving so hard at the monitor engineer throughout a show that it looks like they are trying to land a plane. I will only have my guitar in the monitors if I have a problem getting over the volume of the band. I do have the Acoustic through the monitors and I really have to rely on that.

Q: Is there a song you would like to one day cover?

MB: I am not a person that likes to cover other artists. It is just not my thing I am afraid.

Q: What strings and gauges do you use and do you have different preferences for different types of guitars, say between a Strat and a Les Paul?

MB: I am endorsed by Rotosound Pink Elec: 9-41 Acoustic 11-56 They are great strings and never let me down.

Q: Do you have a preference in what kind of guitar picks you use?

MB: I have recently started using a really thick pick Jim Dunlop Big Stubby 3.00mm

Q: What sort of pedals make up your live rig?

MB: Boss Chorus, Boss Tuner, Carl Martin Chorus, Jim Dunlop 5535Q Cry Baby Wah Wah

Q: What Amplification do you use.

MB: I am endorsed by Engl Amps and Speakers Germany. They are fantastic and very reliable. I presently use the Artist Edition Amplifiers with my own custom speakers grills with my name along side the Engl logo, that the company made for me.

Q: Do you watch people’s You Tube videos doing covers of your material?

MB: Only if I run across them.

Q: Finally, if you weren’t doing what you do now, what might you be doing?

MB: A Footballer